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WHAT IS GOING ON WITH BIM? ON THE WAY TO 6D

International Construction Law Review

WHAT IS GOING ON WITH BIM? ON THE WAY TO 6D

ANDREW CHEW AND MEREDITH RILEY1

Corrs Chambers Westgarth, Australia

Introduction

In Australia, there is increasing use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) by public and private owners. This is similar to the global trend as facility owners recognise the productivity, efficiency and quality values that can be derived from BIM technology. BIM is being introduced in a time where there is an increasing push for greater sustainability and when lifecycle costs and savings associated with on-going facilities management (FM) are as relevant as the initial delivery cost. However, BIM introduces its own unique challenges as the construction industry is learning the various issues that must be addressed in managing risks when using BIM.
One of the key issues for owners and contractors is how BIM impacts on the project delivery structure. While BIM may be widely recognised as a tool that is assisting to improve the construction industry’s productivity, there is no consistent approach towards contracting for projects using BIM or how to properly address the unique legal challenges that arise from using BIM. The current approaches that are being utilised can generally be categorised into the following:
  • (1) traditional owner/contractor risk allocation;
  • (2) incorporation of BIM Protocols; and
  • (3) collaborative contracting.
This paper provides an overview of the current approaches to contracting for projects using BIM. Part 1 of this paper provides a general overview of BIM and Part 2 provides a general overview of the global development of BIM. Parts 3, 4 and 5 critically consider the current approaches that are being utilised for contracting for projects using BIM. Finally, Part 6 provides a brief consideration of where BIM is heading in the near future.

1. Overview of BIM2

The BIM concept uses three, four and five-dimensional models to create and manage project information about a structure, and provides a platform
The International Construction Law Review [2013

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